Posts for: April, 2015

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
April 24, 2015
Category: Oral Health
GiulianaRancicPreparesforHerSonsFirstDentalVisit

When Giuliana Rancic, long-time host of E! News, first saw her new son, she said it was “the best single moment of my life.” Recently, on the eve of Duke's first birthday, the TV personality and reality star spoke to Dear Doctor magazine about her growing family, her battle with cancer — and the importance of starting her child off with good oral health.

“Duke will have his first visit with the dentist very soon, and since he is still a baby, we will make his visit as comfortable as possible,” Giuliana said. That's a good thought — as is the timing of her son's office visit. Her husband Bill (co-star of the couple's Style Network show) agrees. “I think the earlier you can start the checkups, the better,” he said.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry concurs. In order to prevent dental problems, the AAPD states, your child should see a dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his or her first birthday. But since a child will lose the primary (baby) teeth anyway, is this visit really so important?

“Baby” Teeth Have a Vital Role
An age one dental visit is very important because primary teeth have several important roles: Kids rely on them for proper nutrition and speech, and don't usually begin losing them until around age 6. And since they aren't completely gone until around age 12, kids will depend on those “baby teeth” through much of childhood. Plus, they serve as guides for the proper position of the permanent teeth, and are vital to their health. That's why it's so important to care for them properly.

One major goal for the age one dental visit is to identify potential dental issues and prevent them from becoming serious problems. For example, your child will be examined for early signs of dental diseases, including baby bottle tooth decay which is a major cause of early childhood caries. Controlling these problems early can help youngsters start on the road to a lifetime of good oral health.

Besides screening your child for a number of other dental conditions or developmental problems, and assessing his or her risk for cavities, the age one visit also gives you the opportunity to ask any questions you may have about dental health in these early years. Plus, you can learn the best techniques for effectively cleaning baby's mouth and maintaining peak oral hygiene.

Breezing Through the Age-One Visit
To ease your child's way through his or her first dental visit, it helps if you're calm yourself. Try to relax, allow plenty of time, and bring along lots of activities — some favorite toys, games or stuffed animals will add to everyone's comfort level. A healthy snack, drink, and spare diapers (of course) won't go unappreciated.

“We'll probably bring some toys and snacks as reinforcements,” said Giuliana of her son's upcoming visit. So take a tip from the Rancics: The age one dental visit is a great way to start your child off right.

If you would like more information on pediatric dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Age One Dental Visit” and “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children.”


By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
April 23, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Teeth Whitening  

Teeth WhiteningIf you're thinking about whitening your teeth, you'd be joining the 100 million Americans who have tried a dental bleaching product or procedure. Needless to say, whitening now leads the cosmetic industry; the products are easily obtained and very affordable. But are they safe? Because the dentists at Carey & Aylward in Westland know that it's important to make an informed decision about your health, here are some facts about the safety of dental whitening.

More isn't better

It may seem like a good idea to extend the time you wear whitening strips or trays to achieve a brighter smile in faster time. However, your Westland dentist advises against going "off-label" for several reasons.

First, the overuse of whitening chemicals can actually bring on the opposite effect - your teeth can become mottled and unevenly colored if the trays or strips are left in place too long. They can even permanently dull the finish on your enamel.

Leaving whitening products on longer than instructed can also have painful consequences. The gum tissue can become very irritated from exposure to the chemicals. If the enamel is compromised, the teeth can become extremely sensitive to hot and cold stimuli (coffee, ice cream, and so on). If you have an untreated cavity or fracture, the whitening chemicals can edge into these spaces, potentially causing internal nerve damage.

Expert opinion

It may ease your mind to know that the American Dental Association has placed their Seal of Acceptance on many whitening systems and procedures, including some that can be purchased at pharmacies or grocery stores. However, these industry experts caution that a dental professional should be consulted before beginning any treatment. Checking for the ADA's seal and talking with your southeastern Michigan dentist about the product will help put you on the right track for whiter teeth.

Leave it to the pros

For those who want quick but safe results, a visit to your Westland dental office would be your best option. In-office whitening treatments usually only take as long as a lunch break - between 30 and 60 minutes. Upon completion, the results are immediately visible. In-office whitening can last up to a year, much longer than over-the-counter systems, and with your dentist at the helm, your safety and satisfaction is the ultimate goal.

Don't let discolored teeth keep you from smiling. Contact the team at Carey & Aylward DDS in Westland today for a consultation.


WithProperCareVeneersareaLong-TermOptionforStainedTeeth

Your otherwise beautiful smile has one noticeable flaw — one or more of your teeth are deeply discolored or stained. More than likely this staining is deep within the teeth, what we refer to as intrinsic staining. There are a number of reasons this can occur — from fillings or use of antibiotics, for example — and our first approach should be to attempt a whitening technique.

However, if that doesn't produce the desired result, porcelain laminate veneers are another option you might consider. Veneers are made of dental porcelain, a bio-compatible material that can be shaped and colored to closely match neighboring teeth. After a minimal amount of tooth reduction (removal of some of the enamel from the tooth surface) to prepare for the laminate, the veneers are then permanently bonded to the tooth surface and cover the discolored natural tooth. Besides changing the appearance of discolored or stained teeth, veneers can also be used to correct other imperfections such as chipped or misshapen teeth.

Patients, however, have a common question: how long will the veneers last? With proper care, veneers can last anywhere from seven years to more than twenty years. It's possible, though, to damage them — for example, you can break them if you bite down on something that goes beyond the porcelain's tolerance range, such as cracking nut shells with your teeth (not a good idea even for natural teeth!). You should also keep in mind that veneers are composed of inert, non-living material and are attached and surrounded by living gum tissue that can change over time. This process may eventually alter your appearance to the point that the veneer may need to be removed and reapplied to improve the look of your smile.

If a veneer is damaged, all is not necessarily lost. It may be possible to re-bond a loosened veneer or repair a chipped area. The worst case is replacement of the veneer altogether. Chances are, though, this will only happen after the veneer has already served you — and your smile — for many years.

If you would like more information on porcelain laminate veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers.”