Posts for: January, 2016

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
January 26, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dental Crowns   bridges  

Do you have teeth which you consider to be unsightly? Are you annoyed by a gap left from an extracted or lost tooth? If you answered dental crowns, bridgesyes to these questions, you could benefit from two common dental procedures to repair these issues and renew your smile. Determining if your teeth require dental restorations is as easy as asking your Westland, MI dentist at Carey and Aylward DDS about crowns and bridges.

What do crowns and bridges do? 
Crowns and bridges are indirect dental restorations, meaning they are permanent and non-removable. Crowns are a tooth-shaped cap which fits over a compromised tooth to strengthen and stabilize it. Bridges use crowns to secure a prosthetic tooth in place, filling in the gap left behind from a missing tooth. The purpose of these restorations is to give you back your smile, boosting confidence and allowing you to chew and speak normally.

When do I need a crown? 
Dentists use dental crowns to strengthen and stabilize teeth. Teeth with the following abnormalities benefit from crowns:

  • broken
  • cracked
  • large fillings, particularly after root canal therapy
  • worn down teeth

In addition to strengthening compromised teeth, crowns also improve the teeth’s appearance. If a tooth is severely stained or misshaped, a crown can cover the tooth’s imperfections.

When do I need a bridge? 
Bridges fill the gaps left behind from missing teeth. The bridge itself is made up of three prosthetic teeth: two crowns on either end and a full prosthetic in the center, which sits on the gum line above the socket of your missing tooth. The two crowns sit over the natural teeth on either side of the gap, securing the bridge to the teeth permanently.

How are crowns and bridges made and placed? 
A specialist in a dental laboratory uses a mold of your teeth taken by your dentist to design your crown or bridge. Each restoration is customized completely for your mouth, ensuring a natural look and secure fit. Crowns and bridges require two dental appointments. At the first appointment, your dentist prepares your tooth to receive the crown. Your dentist shapes the tooth accordingly and a temporary crown may be placed until the permanent restoration arrives. A second appointment, scheduled after the dental lab sends your completed crown or bridge to your dentist’s office, completes the procedure. Your dentist removes the temporary crown and permanently attaches the permanent prosthetic to your tooth using dental cement.

For more information on crowns and bridges, please contact Carey & Aylward DDS in Westland, MI. Call (734) 425-9130 to schedule your consultation today!


By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
January 22, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: orthodontics   oral surgery  
ExposingandPreservingImpactedCanineTeeth

The final emergence of permanent teeth in late adolescence marks the end of a long process beginning in the womb with the formation of our primary or “baby” teeth. Permanent teeth form in a similar way as buds high in the jaw, continuing to grow until the primary teeth ahead of them fall away. The crowns of the new adult teeth eventually break through the gum tissue and emerge (erupt) into view.

At least, that’s normally what should happen; sometimes, though, a tooth may only erupt partially or not at all, a condition known as impaction. The crown remains partially or fully submerged below the gum line, causing the tooth to press against other teeth, potentially damaging them. It can also make periodontal (gum) tissues adjacent to the area more susceptible to disease. Wisdom teeth are especially prone to this kind of impaction, to the extent they’re often surgically removed (extracted) to avoid future problems to adjacent teeth or the bite.

Upper canines (the “eye teeth” normally located directly below the eyes) are also subject to impaction. But because of their highly visible position, extracting them could have an adverse impact on the patient’s smile. In this case, we often attempt instead to expose and ultimately save the tooth.

Before taking any action, however, an orthodontic examination is conducted first to pinpoint the exact position of the impacted tooth and determine how that position might affect moving teeth into a more desired alignment. If we find the impacted canine is in a workable position, the next step is to surgically uncover the tooth from the gum tissue (a minor procedure usually performed by an oral surgeon or periodontist). Once exposed, an orthodontic bracket with a small attached gold chain is bonded to the tooth. The gums are then sutured back into place with the chain exposed and allowed to heal.

At some future point an orthodontist will attach the chain to orthodontic hardware that will pull the impacted tooth into proper position over several months. As a result, the upper canine becomes “un-impacted”; the dangers to surrounding teeth and tissues are also reduced. And, just as important, we can preserve the tooth and with orthodontics achieve an attractive, normal smile.

If you would like more information on the effects and treatment of impacted teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Exposing Impacted Canines.”


By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
January 07, 2016
Category: Oral Health
GiancarloStantonGetsMajor-LeagueMouthProtection

For major-league slugger Giancarlo Stanton, 2014 was a record-breaking year. After the baseball season ended, he signed a 13-year, $325 million contract with the Miami Marlins — the biggest deal in sports history. But earlier that same year, Stanton suffered one of the worst accidents in baseball: He was hit in the face by an 88-mph fastball, sustaining multiple fractures, lacerations, and extensive dental damage.

After the accident, Stanton didn’t play for the remainder of the season. But now he’s back in Spring Training… and he’s got a not-so-secret weapon to help protect him against another injury: A custom-made face guard designed to absorb impacts and keep him from suffering further trauma.

As sports fans, we’re glad that Stanton was able to overcome his injury and get back in the game. As dentists, we’d like to remind you that you don’t have to be a major-league player to feel the harmful effects of a sports injury — and you don’t have to look far to find a way to protect yourself. In fact, you can get a custom-made mouthguard right here at the dental office.

Mouthguards have a long tradition in sports like football, boxing, and hockey. But did you know that far more Americans are injured every year playing “non-collision” sports like basketball, baseball — and even bicycling? And it doesn’t take a major-league fastball to cause a dental injury: The highest incidence of sports-related dental injuries occurs in 15-to-18-year-old males. In fact, about one-third of all dental injuries among children stem from various types of sports activities. These injuries may result in countless hours being lost from school and work, and cost significant sums for treatment and restoration.

Mouthguards have a proven track record in reducing dental and facial injuries: They are capable of absorbing the energy of a blow to the mouth, and dissipating it in a way that prevents damage to facial structures and teeth. But not all mouthguards are created equal: Custom-fabricated mouthguards, which are produced from an exact model of your mouth made right here in the dental office, offer by far the best protection. They fit better and safeguard the teeth more fully than any off-the-shelf or “boil-and-bite” type can. Plus, they’re more comfortable to wear. And let’s face it: No mouth guard can protect your teeth if you don’t wear it.

What’s more, some recent studies indicate that custom-made mouthguards may offer significant protection against concussion. An increasing awareness of the dangers that concussion may pose to athletes is one more reason why we recommend custom-made mouthguards to active people and their families.

To get his face guard, Giancarlo Stanton reportedly went to a specialist sporting-goods manufacturer in Illinois, and paid around $1,000. But you can get a custom-made mouthguard for yourself or your loved ones right at our office for a fraction of that price. And the peace of mind it can give you is… priceless.

If you have questions about custom-made mouthguards, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry” and “Athletic Mouthguards.”