Posts for: March, 2018

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
March 16, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: braces   retainer  
WhyaBondedRetainerMightbeaBetterChoiceAfterBraces

A lot of time and effort goes into straightening your smile. But there’s a possibility it might not stay that way—and all that hard work could be lost. The same natural mechanism that enables your teeth to move with braces could cause them to revert to their old, undesirable positions.

So for a little while (or longer for some people) you’ll need to wear a retainer, an appliance designed to keep or “retain” your teeth where they are now. And while the removable type is perhaps the best known, there’s at least one other choice you might want to consider: a bonded retainer.

Just as its name implies, this retainer consists of a thin metal wire bonded to the back of the teeth with a composite material. Unlike the removable appliance, a bonded retainer is fixed and can only be removed by an orthodontist.

Bonded retainers have several advantages. Perhaps the most important one is cosmetic—unlike the removable version, others can’t see a bonded retainer since it’s hidden behind the teeth. There’s also no keeping up with it—or losing it—since it’s fixed in place, which might be helpful with some younger patients who need reminding about keeping their retainer in their mouth.

There are, however, a few disadvantages. It’s much harder to floss with a bonded retainer, which could increase the risks of dental disease. It’s also possible for it to break, in which case it will need to be repaired by an orthodontist and as soon as possible. Without it in place for any length of time the teeth could move out of alignment.

If you or a family member is about to have braces removed, you’ll soon need to make a decision on which retainer to use. We’ll discuss these options with you and help you choose the one—removable or bonded—that’s right for you.

If you would like more information on bonded retainers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “Bonded Retainers: What are the Pros and Cons?


By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
March 13, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  

Oral hygiene habits are effective only if you're consistent. The American Dental Association says children through senior adults should oral hygienebrush twice daily for two minutes and floss once a day. But, what occurs if you neglect one or both of these common practices? Your Westland, MI, dentists, Dr. Dennis Aylward, Dr. Brent Carey and Dr. Allison Carey promote brushing and flossing as the best defenses against tooth decay and gum disease.

You only have one set

We all get one set of permanent teeth and a limited amount of gum tissue. Both require careful attention--not only from your Westland, MI, dentists with check-ups and hygienic cleanings, but also with good brushing and flossing at home.

These habits should begin early on, as soon as that first baby tooth erupts. Mom or Dad, be sure to brush it with a small smear of non-fluoride toothpaste and a soft brush. Then, as your youngster grows, add flossing, and do it for your child until he or she has the dexterity and discipline to go solo.

Teens, adults and seniors, keep going with your own brushing and flossing. They remove the soft plaque which accumulates on and between teeth and at the gum line. Plaque quickly hardens into tartar, and both biofilms contain harmful bacteria that feed on food residues. In turn, the bacteria secrete corrosive acids, leading to tooth decay and periodontal disease.

Best ways to brush and floss

Select a fluoride toothpaste and soft brush (and change it when it wears out or after a cold or flu). Put the bristles at a 45-degree angle to your teeth, and slowly brush back and forth, covering the front, back and chewing surfaces. Stay at it for two full minutes, and don't forget to clean your gums, tongue, and hard palate. Rinse well with water.

For best flossing, choose a product you feel comfortable with:

  • Waxed floss
  • Plain floss
  • Flavored floss
  • Y-shaped flosser
  • Interproximal brushes
  • Water flossers

Whatever your preference, use it each day. Be gentle, and expect some minor bleeding if your gums are unaccustomed to flossing. If you wear braces, have restorations such as crowns or bridgework, or have tooth replacements such as dental implants, ask your hygienist or Westland, MI, dentist for additional tips on how to keep them clean.

A word about diet

You know sugar and carbs lead to tooth decay; so limit them. But, also, add these beneficial dietary choices:

  • Water
  • Fiber (fruits and vegetables)
  • Low-fat protein
  • High-calcium dairy products

Learn all you can

It's never too late to start a good habit, and your teeth and gums will benefit from your diligence in oral hygiene. Additionally, see your Westland, MI, dentist every six months for a check-up and professional cleaning to preserve your healthy smile. Call Carey & Aylward, DDS today for an appointment: (734) 425-9130.


By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
March 01, 2018
Category: Oral Health
ActorDavidRamseySaysDontForgettoFloss

Can you have healthy teeth and still have gum disease? Absolutely! And if you don’t believe us, just ask actor David Ramsey. The cast member of TV hits such as Dexter and Arrow said in a recent interview that up to the present day, he has never had a single cavity. Yet at a routine dental visit during his college years, Ramsey’s dentist pointed out how easily his gums bled during the exam. This was an early sign of periodontal (gum) disease, the dentist told him.

“I learned that just because you don’t have cavities, doesn’t mean you don’t have periodontal disease,” Ramsey said.

Apparently, Ramsey had always been very conscientious about brushing his teeth but he never flossed them.

“This isn’t just some strange phenomenon that exists just in my house — a lot of people who brush don’t really floss,” he noted.

Unfortunately, that’s true — and we’d certainly like to change it. So why is flossing so important?

Oral diseases such as tooth decay and periodontal disease often start when dental plaque, a bacteria-laden film that collects on teeth, is allowed to build up. These sticky deposits can harden into a substance called tartar or calculus, which is irritating to the gums and must be removed during a professional teeth cleaning.

Brushing teeth is one way to remove soft plaque, but it is not effective at reaching bacteria or food debris between teeth. That’s where flossing comes in. Floss can fit into spaces that your toothbrush never reaches. In fact, if you don’t floss, you’re leaving about a third to half of your tooth surfaces unclean — and, as David Ramsey found out, that’s a path to periodontal disease.

Since then, however, Ramsey has become a meticulous flosser, and he proudly notes that the long-ago dental appointment “was the last we heard of any type of gum disease.”

Let that be the same for you! Just remember to brush and floss, eat a good diet low in sugar, and come in to the dental office for regular professional cleanings.

If you would like more information on flossing or periodontal disease, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Understanding Gum (Periodontal) Disease.”