Posts for tag: oral hygiene

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
August 31, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  

We all know that regular visits to the dentist are imperative for good dental health. But it's what you do in the meantime that can help makeoral hygiene those visits quicker and less expensive. It's a proven fact: good brushing and flossing habits equal fewer cavities. Below, your Westland, MI dentists - Dr. Dennis Aylward, Dr. Brent Carey, and Dr. Allison Carey - have detailed some information of the best ways you can keep your teeth healthy between appointments at Carey & Aylward.

Brushing

Brushing your teeth has likely become such an ingrained habit that you don't even think about it anymore. However, your Westland dentist suggests reevaluating the way you brush to make sure you're getting the most out of this important ritual. First, you should brush twice daily at minimum; between each meal is preferred. Two minutes may seem like a long time, but if you think about your mouth as being divided into quadrants - upper right, lower right, upper left, lower left - it'll only take you thirty seconds for each area. You should also make sure that your toothbrush has soft, but sturdy bristles; if they look frayed or out of shape, it's time to get a new toothbrush.

Flossing

Flossing between each tooth might seem negligible, but to avoid gum disease and hidden decay, your Westland dentist recommends working it into your daily habits. You only need to floss once a day, so choose a time that works best for you. Instead of the spooled floss, which can be messy and difficult, find the flossing picks, or "swords," at any supermarket or pharmacy. They make the process much easier and allow for convenience. For each day you floss, mark off your progress on a calendar to encourage you to keep going. Within a month or so, flossing will be a standard part of your dental hygiene routine!

At Carey & Aylward DDS in Westland, MI, we want to help you achieve your best dental health. Contact our office for an appointment or if you have any further questions about how to improve your oral hygiene routine at home.

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
May 23, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  

Are you curious to know whether mouthwash could up your oral health game?oral hygiene

Do you currently use mouthwash every day? Are you contemplating whether or not you should start using mouthwash? The mouthwashes that you find in your oral care aisle may be a great way to temporarily give you fresher breath before that big date, but our Westland, MI, dentists, Dr. Dennis Aylward and Drs. Brent and Allison Carey, weigh in on whether or not using mouthwash is a necessity.

To Use Mouthwash or Not to Use Mouthwash…

The simple answer is that mouthwash is not crucial for maintaining a healthy smile. If you are turning to mouthwash to clean your teeth and you aren’t brushing and flossing regularly or properly, this will lead to issues with your oral health. Of course, this doesn’t mean that if you use mouthwash as part of your routine that you should stop. In fact, mouthwash is a lovely way to enhance your everyday dental routine.

Mouthwash can help to dislodge plaque and food particles from between teeth, which makes it a great product to use prior to flossing and brushing your teeth. Of course, if you don’t have mouthwash handy, swishing water around in your mouth will do the trick, too. Mouthwash can certainly provide you with fresh, minty breath and the feeling of a cleaner smile, but many times mouthwash only masks that unpleasant breath. If you find that you are dealing with chronic bad breath then you may want to talk to our Westland general dentists, as this could be a sign of decay or other issues.

Cosmetic vs. Therapeutic Mouthwashes

Didn’t think there were different kinds of mouthwashes, did you? Cosmetic mouthwashes are the products you can find at your local drugstore or grocery store. They boast fresh breath and they pretty much act like perfume for your smile. Therapeutic mouthwash, on the other hand, can help tackle issues such as canker sores and gingivitis (the early stages of gum disease) or even control plaque buildup.

If you want to learn more about therapeutic mouthwash and whether it’s right for you then call Carey & Aylward in Westland, MI, today. We would be happy to help you figure out the best ways to keep your smile feeling and looking its best.

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
April 11, 2017
Category: Oral Health
CleanYourImplantsJustLikeyouCleanYourNaturalTeeth

Dental implants to replace teeth are a popular choice as much for their durability as their life-likeness. Most implants last for decades, which can result in lower long-term maintenance costs than other replacement options.

But to achieve this longevity, you must take care of your implants. You should brush and floss them daily right along with your remaining natural teeth — and continue regular semi-annual dental visits for cleanings and checkups.

You may be wondering, though: if they're made of inorganic materials, why worry with brushing them? It's true that bacterial plaque, the thin film of food particles most responsible for dental disease, doesn't affect them.

Your implants, though, don't exist in a bubble: they're imbedded in real bone, surrounded by real gum tissue and placed next to real teeth. All these other living tissues are susceptible to infection caused by plaque, even from plaque on non-organic implants.

The bone and tissues around an implant can even have a higher susceptibility to infection. This is because an implant's attachment in the jaw differs from that of natural teeth. An implant is imbedded directly into the bone; a natural tooth, on the other hand, maintains its hold through an elastic gum tissue between it and the bone called the periodontal ligament. Tiny fibers from the ligament attach to the tooth on one side and to the bone on the other.

Besides holding the tooth in place, the ligament also contains blood vessels that supply the tooth and surrounding tissues not only with nutrients but also antibodies that help fight infection. Due to the absence of a ligament connection, an implant doesn't enjoy the same level of protection from infection.  It's much easier for tissues and teeth around an implant to become infected, and harder to stop it.

That's why prevention through daily hygiene is so important. So, be sure to brush and floss all your teeth — including implants — every day, and keep up your regular dental visits. And at the first sign of a possible infection — swollen, red or bleeding gums — see us as soon as possible for an examination.

Consider your implants a long-term investment in both your smile and dental health. Taking care of them will pay dividends for many years to come.

If you would like more information on taking care of your dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance.”

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
March 27, 2017
Category: Oral Health
BeyonceMakesFlossingaFamilyAffair

As is the case with most celebs today, Beyonce is no stranger to sharing on social media… but she really got our attention with a video she recently posted on instagram. The clip shows the superstar songstress — along with her adorable three-year old daughter Blue Ivy — flossing their teeth! In the background, a vocalist (sounding remarkably like her husband Jay-Z) repeats the phrase “flossin’…flossin’…” as mom and daughter appear to take care of their dental hygiene in time with the beat: https://instagram.com/p/073CF1vw07/?taken-by=beyonce

We’re happy that this clip highlights the importance of helping kids get an early start on good oral hygiene. And, according to authorities like the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, age 3 is about the right time for kids to begin getting involved in the care of their own teeth.

Of course, parents should start paying attention to their kids’ oral hygiene long before age three. In fact, as soon as baby’s tiny teeth make their first appearance, the teeth and gums can be cleaned with a soft brush or cloth and a smear of fluoride toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice. Around age 3, kids will develop the ability to spit out toothpaste. That’s when you can increase the amount of toothpaste a little, and start explaining to them how you clean all around the teeth on the top and bottom of the mouth. Depending on your child’s dexterity, age 3 might be a good time to let them have a try at brushing by themselves.

Ready to help your kids take the first steps to a lifetime of good dental checkups? Place a pea-sized dab of fluoride toothpaste on a soft-bristled brush, and gently guide them as they clean in front, in back, on all surfaces of each tooth. At first, it’s a good idea to take turns brushing. That way, you can be sure they’re learning the right techniques and keeping their teeth plaque-free, while making the experience challenging and fun.

Most kids will need parental supervision and help with brushing until around age 6. As they develop better hand-eye coordination and the ability to follow through with the cleaning regimen, they can be left on their own more. But even the best may need some “brushing up” on their tooth-cleaning techniques from time to time.

What about flossing? While it’s an essential part of good oral hygiene, it does take a little more dexterity to do it properly. Flossing the gaps between teeth should be started when the teeth begin growing close to one another. Depending on how a child’s teeth are spaced, perhaps only the back ones will need to be flossed at first. Even after they learn to brush, kids may still need help flossing — but a floss holder (like the one Beyonce is using in the clip) can make the job a lot easier.

If you would like more information about maintaining your children’s oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Top 10 Oral Health Tips For Children” and “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
December 11, 2016
Category: Oral Health
AnyTimeAnyPlaceCamNewtonsGuidetoFlossing

When is the best time to floss your teeth: Morning? Bedtime? How about: whenever and wherever the moment feels right?

For Cam Newton, award-winning NFL quarterback for the Carolina Panthers, the answer is clearly the latter. During the third quarter of the 2016 season-opener between his team and the Denver Broncos, TV cameras focused on Newton as he sat on the bench. The 2015 MVP was clearly seen stretching a string of dental floss between his index fingers and taking care of some dental hygiene business… and thereby creating a minor storm on the internet.

Inappropriate? We don't think so. As dentists, we're always happy when someone comes along to remind people how important it is to floss. And when that person has a million-dollar smile like Cam Newton's — so much the better.

Of course, there has been a lot of discussion lately about flossing. News outlets have gleefully reported that there's a lack of hard evidence at present to show that flossing is effective. But we would like to point out that, as the saying goes, “Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.” There are a number of reasons why health care organizations like the American Dental Association (ADA) still firmly recommend daily flossing. Here are a few:

  • It's well established that when plaque is allowed to build up on teeth, tooth decay and gum disease are bound to follow.
  • A tooth brush does a good job of cleaning most tooth surfaces, but it can't reach into spaces between teeth.
  • Cleaning between teeth (interdental cleaning) has been shown to remove plaque and food debris from these hard-to-reach spaces.
  • Dental floss isn't the only method for interdental cleaning… but it is recognized by dentists as the best way, and is an excellent method for doing this at home — or anywhere else!

Whether you use dental floss or another type of interdental cleaner is up to you. But the ADA stands by its recommendations for maintaining good oral health: Brush twice a day for two minutes with fluoride toothpaste; visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and checkups; and clean between teeth once a day with an interdental cleaner like floss. It doesn't matter if you do it in your own home, or on the sidelines of an NFL game… as long as you do it!

If you would like more information about flossing and oral hygiene, contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.