Posts for tag: oral hygiene

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
January 15, 2018
Category: Oral Health
WhyYouShouldStillFlosswithanImplant-SupportedBridge

Losing teeth to tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease is never easy. But with implant-supported bridgework, you can regain lost function and appearance with a restoration that could last for many years.

Don’t think, though, that dental disease woes are a thing of the past with your new implants. Although your restoration itself can’t be infected, the supporting gums and underlying bone can, often through bacterial plaque accumulating around the implants. The bone that supports the implants could deteriorate, dramatically increasing your chances of losing your restoration.

It’s essential, then, that you keep the area between the bridge and gums clean of plaque through daily hygiene. This definitely includes flossing around the implants.

Flossing with an implant-supported bridge will be different than with natural teeth: instead of flossing between teeth you’ll need to thread the floss between the bridge and gums. Although this is a bit more difficult, it can be done with the help of a floss threader, a device with a loop on one end and a long, thin plastic point on the other—similar to a sewing needle.

To use it, thread about 18” of floss through the loop and then pass the threader’s thin end first through the space between the bridge and gums toward the tongue until the floss threader pulls through. You can then take hold of one end of the floss and then pull the threader completely out from beneath the bridge. Then, you wrap the ends around your fingers as you would normally and thoroughly floss the implant surfaces you’re accessing. You then release one end of the floss, pull out the remainder, rethread it in the threader and repeat the process in the next space between implants.

You also have other hygiene tool options: prefabricated floss with stiffened ends that thread through the bridge-gum space that you can use very easily; or you can purchase an interproximal brush that resembles a pipe cleaner with thin plastic bristles to access the space and brush around the implants.

Some patients also find an oral irrigator, a handheld device that sprays a pressurized stream of water to loosen and flush away plaque, to be an effective way of keeping this important area clean. But that said, oral irrigators generally aren’t as effective removing dental plaque as are floss or interproximal brushes.

Whatever flossing method you choose, the important thing is to choose one and practice it every day. By keeping bacterial plaque from building up around your implants, you’ll help ensure you won’t lose your restoration to disease, so it can continue to serve you for many years to come.

If you would like more information on caring for your dental work, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
November 08, 2017
Category: Oral Health
HowBigBangTheoryActressMayimBialikGetsHerKidstoFloss

How many actresses have portrayed a neuroscientist on a wildly successful TV comedy while actually holding an advanced degree in neuroscience? As far as we know, exactly one: Mayim Bialik, who plays the lovably geeky Amy Farrah Fowler on CBS' The Big Bang Theory… and earned her PhD from UCLA.

Acknowledging her nerdy side, Bialik recently told Dear Doctor magazine, “I'm different, and I can't not be different.” Yet when it comes to her family's oral health, she wants the same things we all want: good checkups and great-looking smiles. “We're big on teeth and oral care,” she said. “Flossing is really a pleasure in our house.”

How does she get her two young sons to do it?

Bialik uses convenient pre-loaded floss holders that come complete with floss and a handle. “I just keep them in a little glass right next to the toothbrushes so they're open, no one has to reach, they're just right there,” she said. “It's really become such a routine, I don't even have to ask them anymore.”

As many parents have discovered, establishing healthy routines is one of the best things you can do to maintain your family's oral health. Here are some other oral hygiene tips you can try at home:

Brush to the music — Plenty of pop songs are about two minutes long… and that's the length of time you should brush your teeth. If brushing in silence gets boring, add a soundtrack. When the music's over — you're done!

Flossing can be fun — If standard dental floss doesn't appeal, there are many different styles of floss holders, from functional ones to cartoon characters… even some with a martial-arts theme! Find the one that your kids like best, and encourage them to use it.

The eyes don't lie — To show your kids how well (or not) they are cleaning their teeth, try using an over-the-counter disclosing solution. This harmless product will temporarily stain any plaque or debris that got left behind after brushing, so they can immediately see where they missed, and how to improve their hygiene technique — which will lead to better health.

Have regular dental exams & cleanings — When kids see you're enthusiastic about going to the dental office, it helps them feel the same way… and afterward, you can point out how great it feels to have a clean, sparkling smile.

For more information about oral hygiene, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read the interview with Mayim Bialik in the latest issue of Dear Doctor magazine.

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
August 31, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  

We all know that regular visits to the dentist are imperative for good dental health. But it's what you do in the meantime that can help makeoral hygiene those visits quicker and less expensive. It's a proven fact: good brushing and flossing habits equal fewer cavities. Below, your Westland, MI dentists - Dr. Dennis Aylward, Dr. Brent Carey, and Dr. Allison Carey - have detailed some information of the best ways you can keep your teeth healthy between appointments at Carey & Aylward.

Brushing

Brushing your teeth has likely become such an ingrained habit that you don't even think about it anymore. However, your Westland dentist suggests reevaluating the way you brush to make sure you're getting the most out of this important ritual. First, you should brush twice daily at minimum; between each meal is preferred. Two minutes may seem like a long time, but if you think about your mouth as being divided into quadrants - upper right, lower right, upper left, lower left - it'll only take you thirty seconds for each area. You should also make sure that your toothbrush has soft, but sturdy bristles; if they look frayed or out of shape, it's time to get a new toothbrush.

Flossing

Flossing between each tooth might seem negligible, but to avoid gum disease and hidden decay, your Westland dentist recommends working it into your daily habits. You only need to floss once a day, so choose a time that works best for you. Instead of the spooled floss, which can be messy and difficult, find the flossing picks, or "swords," at any supermarket or pharmacy. They make the process much easier and allow for convenience. For each day you floss, mark off your progress on a calendar to encourage you to keep going. Within a month or so, flossing will be a standard part of your dental hygiene routine!

At Carey & Aylward DDS in Westland, MI, we want to help you achieve your best dental health. Contact our office for an appointment or if you have any further questions about how to improve your oral hygiene routine at home.

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
May 23, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  

Are you curious to know whether mouthwash could up your oral health game?oral hygiene

Do you currently use mouthwash every day? Are you contemplating whether or not you should start using mouthwash? The mouthwashes that you find in your oral care aisle may be a great way to temporarily give you fresher breath before that big date, but our Westland, MI, dentists, Dr. Dennis Aylward and Drs. Brent and Allison Carey, weigh in on whether or not using mouthwash is a necessity.

To Use Mouthwash or Not to Use Mouthwash…

The simple answer is that mouthwash is not crucial for maintaining a healthy smile. If you are turning to mouthwash to clean your teeth and you aren’t brushing and flossing regularly or properly, this will lead to issues with your oral health. Of course, this doesn’t mean that if you use mouthwash as part of your routine that you should stop. In fact, mouthwash is a lovely way to enhance your everyday dental routine.

Mouthwash can help to dislodge plaque and food particles from between teeth, which makes it a great product to use prior to flossing and brushing your teeth. Of course, if you don’t have mouthwash handy, swishing water around in your mouth will do the trick, too. Mouthwash can certainly provide you with fresh, minty breath and the feeling of a cleaner smile, but many times mouthwash only masks that unpleasant breath. If you find that you are dealing with chronic bad breath then you may want to talk to our Westland general dentists, as this could be a sign of decay or other issues.

Cosmetic vs. Therapeutic Mouthwashes

Didn’t think there were different kinds of mouthwashes, did you? Cosmetic mouthwashes are the products you can find at your local drugstore or grocery store. They boast fresh breath and they pretty much act like perfume for your smile. Therapeutic mouthwash, on the other hand, can help tackle issues such as canker sores and gingivitis (the early stages of gum disease) or even control plaque buildup.

If you want to learn more about therapeutic mouthwash and whether it’s right for you then call Carey & Aylward in Westland, MI, today. We would be happy to help you figure out the best ways to keep your smile feeling and looking its best.

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
April 11, 2017
Category: Oral Health
CleanYourImplantsJustLikeyouCleanYourNaturalTeeth

Dental implants to replace teeth are a popular choice as much for their durability as their life-likeness. Most implants last for decades, which can result in lower long-term maintenance costs than other replacement options.

But to achieve this longevity, you must take care of your implants. You should brush and floss them daily right along with your remaining natural teeth — and continue regular semi-annual dental visits for cleanings and checkups.

You may be wondering, though: if they're made of inorganic materials, why worry with brushing them? It's true that bacterial plaque, the thin film of food particles most responsible for dental disease, doesn't affect them.

Your implants, though, don't exist in a bubble: they're imbedded in real bone, surrounded by real gum tissue and placed next to real teeth. All these other living tissues are susceptible to infection caused by plaque, even from plaque on non-organic implants.

The bone and tissues around an implant can even have a higher susceptibility to infection. This is because an implant's attachment in the jaw differs from that of natural teeth. An implant is imbedded directly into the bone; a natural tooth, on the other hand, maintains its hold through an elastic gum tissue between it and the bone called the periodontal ligament. Tiny fibers from the ligament attach to the tooth on one side and to the bone on the other.

Besides holding the tooth in place, the ligament also contains blood vessels that supply the tooth and surrounding tissues not only with nutrients but also antibodies that help fight infection. Due to the absence of a ligament connection, an implant doesn't enjoy the same level of protection from infection.  It's much easier for tissues and teeth around an implant to become infected, and harder to stop it.

That's why prevention through daily hygiene is so important. So, be sure to brush and floss all your teeth — including implants — every day, and keep up your regular dental visits. And at the first sign of a possible infection — swollen, red or bleeding gums — see us as soon as possible for an examination.

Consider your implants a long-term investment in both your smile and dental health. Taking care of them will pay dividends for many years to come.

If you would like more information on taking care of your dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance.”