By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
May 10, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: TMJ   jaw pain   teeth grinding  

Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ) is a facial and dental problem that affects between 5 and 12 percent of the population. The jaw pain, YMJsymptoms range from mild to severe, and in severe cases it can disrupt a patient’s ability to eat, talk and live in comfort. Find out how the dentists at Carey & Aylawrd, DDS, PC can help you prevent TMJ problems at their Westland, MI dentist office.

What Is TMJ?

TMJ disorder is a condition that involves the hinge that connects the upper and lower jaw. The joint (hinge) becomes irritated or inflamed, causing discomfort and a number of inconvenient symptoms. It causes pain, swelling and a clicking sound when you chew. In advanced cases, it can make your jaw lock so that it’s difficult to open your mouth. This disorder can develop due to arthritis or a poorly aligned jaw, but it is most often caused by grinding and clenching your teeth.

Preventing TMJ Complications

If you grind and clench your teeth (also called bruxism) while you’re sleeping or when you’re frustrated and stressed, you could be at risk of developing TMJ problems. The best way to prevent TMJ is to get a custom fit mouth guard made at your Westland, MI dentist office. This mouth guard forms a barrier between your upper and lower rows of teeth so that you can no longer clench them together. Over time, it can help you get into the habit of resting your teeth together normally.

How to Get Your Custom Mouth Guard

The process of getting a custom fit mouth guard is a very simple and straightforward process that will take two relatively short appointments. At the first appointment, the dentist will take an impression of your teeth to send to the lab. At the second appointment, you’ll be fitted with your custom-designed mouth guard. Your dentist will provide you with detailed instructions on how you can use this dental tool to prevent TMJ symptoms.

No More Grinding and Clenching

If you grind and clench, it’s important to stop this habitual behavior in its tracks to avoid developing TMJ problems. Schedule an appointment with Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC at their Westland, MI dentist office today by calling (734) 425-9130.

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
April 29, 2016
Category: Oral Health
DrTravisStorkDontIgnoreBleedingGums

Are bleeding gums something you should be concerned about? Dear Doctor magazine recently posed that question to Dr. Travis Stork, an emergency room physician and host of the syndicated TV show The Doctors. He answered with two questions of his own: “If you started bleeding from your eyeball, would you seek medical attention?” Needless to say, most everyone would. “So,” he asked, “why is it that when we bleed all the time when we floss that we think it’s no big deal?” As it turns out, that’s an excellent question — and one that’s often misunderstood.

First of all, let’s clarify what we mean by “bleeding all the time.” As many as 90 percent of people occasionally experience bleeding gums when they clean their teeth — particularly if they don’t do it often, or are just starting a flossing routine. But if your gums bleed regularly when you brush or floss, it almost certainly means there’s a problem. Many think bleeding gums is a sign they are brushing too hard; this is possible, but unlikely. It’s much more probable that irritated and bleeding gums are a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

How common is this malady? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, nearly half of all  Americans over age 30 have mild, moderate or severe gum disease — and that number increases to 70.1 percent for those over 65! Periodontal disease can occur when a bacteria-rich biofilm in the mouth (also called plaque) is allowed to build up on tooth and gum surfaces. Plaque causes the gums to become inflamed, as the immune system responds to the bacteria. Eventually, this can cause gum tissue to pull away from the teeth, forming bacteria-filled “pockets” under the gum surface. If left untreated, it can lead to more serious infection, and even tooth loss.

What should you do if your gums bleed regularly when brushing or flossing? The first step is to come in for a thorough examination. In combination with a regular oral exam (and possibly x-rays or other diagnostic tests), a simple (and painless) instrument called a periodontal probe can be used to determine how far any periodontal disease may have progressed. Armed with this information, we can determine the most effective way to fight the battle against gum disease.

Above all, don’t wait too long to come in for an exam! As Dr. Stork notes, bleeding gums are “a sign that things aren’t quite right.”  If you would like more information about bleeding gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.” You can read the entire interview with Dr. Travis Stork in Dear Doctor magazine.

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
April 14, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Teeth Whitening  
StainingWithinaToothRequiresaClinicalWhiteningApproach

Home whitening kits are a popular way to turn a dull smile into a dazzling one. But these self-applied products only work for teeth with outer enamel stains — if the discoloration originates inside a tooth, you’ll need professional treatment.

Known as “intrinsic staining,” this type of discoloration most often occurs within a tooth’s pulp or dentin layers. There are a number of causes like tooth trauma or tetracycline use at an early age. A root canal treatment used to remove infection from deep within a tooth can also cause discoloration: sometimes blood pigments left after tissue removal or the filling materials themselves can stain a tooth’s interior.

Intrinsic staining can often be treated by placing a bleaching agent, usually sodium perborate, into the tooth’s pulp chamber. But before undertaking this procedure on a tooth that’s undergone a root canal treatment, we want to first ensure the filling is intact and still adequately sealing the tooth from infection. We also want to make sure the supporting bone is also healthy.

If all’s well, we access the pulp in the same way as the root canal treatment, and preferably through the same access hole. We then clean out the pulp chamber of any stained matter and then ensure the root canals remain filled and sealed off from the pulp chamber.

We can then place the bleaching agent into the pulp, a process that will need to be repeated every three or four days to achieve the desired level of brightness. After each session we place a cotton pellet over the opening and held in place with a temporary adhesive; we can easily remove and re-apply this covering during subsequent sessions. Once we’ve achieved the desired color change, we seal the tooth with a permanent filling and restore the access cavity with a tooth-colored composite resin material bonded to the enamel and dentin.

There are other options for an intrinsically stained tooth like veneers or crowns that outwardly cover the discoloration. Internal bleaching, however, is a more conservative approach that causes less alteration of the tooth. If successful, it can restore a stained tooth to a brighter, more attractive shade.

If you would like more information on internal bleaching, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Whitening Traumatized Teeth.”

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
March 30, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
TomHanksAbscessedToothGetsCastAway

Did you see the move Cast Away starring Tom Hanks? If so, you probably remember the scene where Hanks, stranded on a remote island, knocks out his own abscessed tooth — with an ice skate, no less — to stop the pain. Recently, Dear Doctor TV interviewed Gary Archer, the dental technician who created that special effect and many others.

“They wanted to have an abscess above the tooth with all sorts of gunk and pus and stuff coming out of it,” Archer explained. “I met with Tom and I took impressions [of his mouth] and we came up with this wonderful little piece. It just slipped over his own natural teeth.” The actor could flick it out with his lower tooth when the time was right during the scene. It ended up looking so real that, as Archer said, “it was not for the easily squeamish!”

That’s for sure. But neither is a real abscess, which is an infection that becomes sealed off beneath the gum line. An abscess may result from a trapped piece of food, uncontrolled periodontal (gum) disease, or even an infection deep inside a tooth that has spread to adjacent periodontal tissues. In any case, the condition can cause intense pain due to the pressure that builds up in the pus-filled sac. Prompt treatment is required to relieve the pain, keep the infection from spreading to other areas of the face (or even elsewhere in the body), and prevent tooth loss.

Treatment involves draining the abscess, which usually stops the pain immediately, and then controlling the infection and removing its cause. This may require antibiotics and any of several in-office dental procedures, including gum surgery, a root canal, or a tooth extraction. But if you do have a tooth that can’t be saved, we promise we won’t remove it with an ice skate!

The best way to prevent an abscess from forming in the first place is to practice conscientious oral hygiene. By brushing your teeth twice each day for two minutes, and flossing at least once a day, you will go a long way towards keeping harmful oral bacteria from thriving in your mouth.

If you have any questions about gum disease or abscesses, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Periodontal (Gum) Abscesses” and “Confusing Tooth Pain.”

By Carey & Aylward, DDS, PC
March 15, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures  

Boost the health and appearance of your smile by getting dentures in Westland, MI.

Looking for a quick and easy way to replace your missing teeth and regain a healthy smile again? Then look no further then your DenturesWestland, MI dentist. With dentures, we not only give you a smile that can restore chewing and speaking but also puts confidence back in your appearance. Find out more about what getting dentures entails and the benefits it offers.

What are dentures?

Dentures are oral appliances that are designed to replace all or most of your missing permanent teeth. Dentures can either be cemented into place or removable, depending on how many teeth you need to replace. Partial fixed dentures are also referred to as dental bridges and can replace one or more missing teeth. Full dentures replace all teeth and can be worn all-day and removed at night before bed.

What are the benefits of dentures?

Dentures can offer a variety of benefits for those looking to replace some or all of their teeth:

Renewed confidence: When you are dealing with a gapping smile it can certainly take a toll on your self-esteem. Luckily, when you get a full smile with dentures you can enjoy a complete, confidence smile once again.

Restored chewing and speaking: With missing teeth both chewing and speaking are significantly affected. Luckily, dentures can restore both of these functions to make talking with friends and enjoying meals easier.

Improved appearance: While missing teeth can wreak havoc on your oral health it can also affect your physical appearance. Even though this may not seem like the most important benefit overall making sure that your oral health doesn’t suffer, a healthy smile will significantly boost your overall appearance.

Inexpensive dental treatment: Many patients are looking to get a healthy smile on a budget and while other dental options may offer better benefits they can be more complicated and more expensive. For those looking for a cheaper way to restore their smile, nothing is better than dentures. Furthermore, you can get dentures from your Westland, MI dentist more quickly than other options.

Ready to get a brand new smile? Then schedule a consultation with your Westland, MI dentist and let Carey & Aylward give you the smile you deserve. Dentures can give you the smile you want.





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